Healthy Alternatives for Thanksgiving Dinner

Thanksgiving is a time to be thankful for family, friends, good health and great food. It’s perfectly all right to indulge at Thanksgiving dinner. After all, this special day comes just once a year, and you don’t want to miss the opportunity for a few of your favorite foods-seasoned stuffing, creamy potatoes, juicy turkey and, of course, pie

Thanksgiving’s main event could easily feature a number of nutrient-rich dishes, and no one at your table would be any wiser to the improved offerings. This year, instead of serving the old standbys let’s try some healthier recipes.

Roasted Sweet potatoes: Roasted, baked, boiled, mashed-they all serve up delicate sweetness and lots of fiber, potassium, iron, magnesium and vitamin C as long as you limit the amount of butter and keep the added sweeteners to a minimum.

Whole Grain Stuffing: Whole-grain options like whole-wheat bread have toasty, nutty flavors which are enhanced with fresh spices and low-sodium chicken broth. Hence, are a better base for Thanksgiving stuffing.

Pumpkin Pie: Pick pumpkin pie for fiber and beta carotene and has a wonderful natural sweetness. You can use maple syrup, cinnamon and nutmeg to add delicate sweetness to the filling.

Roasted Turkey: Turkey is rich with protein, and it can be quite lean. Turkey also provides iron, zinc and potassium. Add fresh herbs, olive oil, salt and pepper to the breast and stuff with a variety of aromatics such as lemon, apple, onions, garlic, rosemary and sage to enhance its flavours.

Brussels Sprouts: Roasted or sautéed Brussels sprouts can add a nice contrast of color, texture and balance to your Thanksgiving meal. Sauté them with a little bacon or cheese to make them more tempting.

Fresh Cranberry Sauce: Fresh cranberry sauce is an easy way to add a great deal of nutrients to your Thanksgiving plate in a small serving. Adding juice to your cranberry sauce can help you use less added sugar, or, naturally sweeten with dates and apple cider.

The key is to tweak some of the traditional recipes to make them a bit healthier before you dig in. Keep your feast somewhat healthy by making sure some of the best foods are on your plate, but don’t forgo your favourites.


Source: https://www.eatingwell.com/article/32423/best-and-worst-thanksgiving-foods/

Author: Pallabi Sinha

I am a Nutritionist with 6 years of expertise in the field. I have a knack of convincing people to switch to a healthier lifestyle.